• 20 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #TalentoPúblico: Mejorando la seguridad en Ghana, Kenia y Senegal

    El coronel de la Guardia Civil, Javier Hernández, coordina el proyecto europeo CT-Public Spaces para reforzar la seguridad en Ghana, Kenia y Senegal.

    El Coronel de la Guardia Civil, Javier Hernández

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    ¿Cuál ha sido el mayor logro de tu experiencia como experto/a movilizada? 

     Dirigir un proyecto (CT-Public Spaces) con repercusión en diversos países de África (Ghana, Kenia y Senegal), representando a una Institución,  casi bicentenaria,  como la Guardia Civil y  conseguir sumar  en la mejora de la seguridad de todos. 

     ¿De qué te sientes más orgulloso? 

    De poder trasladar a las fuerzas de seguridad de los países socios  nuestra forma de hacer las cosas, con seriedad y rigor,  así como de haber creado unos vínculos con ellos que trascenderán a la duración del proyecto. 

     ¿Cómo ha contribuido tu misión a mejorar la vida de las personas y el planeta? 

    Intentamos contribuir a la seguridad de los ciudadanos y por ello al desarrollo de sus sociedades. Si lo conseguimos, mejoramos su día a día y a partir de ahí mejoramos sus sociedades, haciendo que sean más libres y prosperas.  

     ¿Cuál es para ti el principal valor de lo público? 

    Proporcionar  seguridad a los ciudadanos es, sin duda, responsabilidad de las administraciones públicas  que por ley son las responsables de ello, pero en  este campo todos somos necesarios, en nuestro Proyecto pretendemos involucrar a los actores privados; todos debemos cooperar, cada uno en el ámbito de sus competencias.  

    ¿Qué has aprendido con esta experiencia?  

    Siempre se aprende y siempre es posible hacer las cosas de otra manera, cada país tiene sus modos, sus tiempos, sus costumbres y sus influencias, hay que estar abiertos a ello, debemos adaptar nuestros procedimientos a las circunstancias, buscar la colaboración sin imponer, generar confianzas y establecer lazos que permitan la continuidad de esa colaboración, así como la apropiación de lo aprendido por las distintas fuerzas de seguridad de los países socios.

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  • 15 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #TalentoPúblico: the fight against organised crime in Central America

    We interview Dolores Moreno, a forensic pathologist and ICRIME project expert in the fight against organised crime in Central America

    Dolores Moreno is a forensic pathologist and has been a member of the National Corps of Forensic Pathologists for over 25 years. She has been director of the National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences attached to the Ministry of Justice and has worked as a FIIAPP expert in Central America as a participant in the ICRIME project in its fight against organised crime. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expatriate expert?  

    ICRIME works with twelve forensic organisations in seven countries. After several visits and continuous contact with their workers, having the opportunity to get to know them, understand their needs and drafting the improvement proposals in keeping with project goals has, I think, been one of my greatest work-related achievements.  

    What are you most proud of?   

    Of having quickly adapted to the central American culture and of having developed a relationship of trust with the directors of forensic institutions in the region.   

    I am also proud of having been able to rally high-level experts from our ministries and involve them in our project.   

    How has your mission as an aid worker and at the same time a public official contributed to improving the lives of people and/or the planet?   

    Cooperation with the public institutions of these countries allows us to share knowledge and the experience acquired in our civil service. We collaborate in making these public institutions more effective and efficient. To do so, we apply management and quality criteria, working on professional training and technological improvement, which results in better service to the public, greater legal security and better management of public resources.   

    What is the main value of the public aspect for you?   

    Public Administrations don’t try to obtain the maximum profit from the services they provide. Consequently, the parameters to be taken into account when selecting a service will only be those of suitability and the achievement of the expected results. I think this is very important when providing basic services such as those related to security and justice.    

    This does not mean that a public service should not be efficient, on the contrary, public officials have become more committed to the administration of resources and are increasingly being trained in efficiency management, albeit never losing sight of social well-being and without putting citizens at risk.   

    What have you learned?  

    During this time I have had the opportunity to delve into how these organisations operate, which has allowed me to learn from their best practices in management, in the organisation of certain procedures and in the way to solve common problems.   

    I have also witnessed the commitment of the staff in these institutions who, despite cultural differences, share a vocation of public service with us. 

  • 13 July 2021

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    #PublicExpertise: Cristina García-Herrera and fiscal cooperation with Latin America

    We interviewed the tax specialist Cristina García-Herrara, Director of Studies at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and expert in the EUROsocial cooperation programme

    Cristina García-Herrera is a specialist in taxation and Director of Studies of the Institute for Tax Studies. In this interview she tells us about her experience as an expert on the programme regarding tax cooperation with Latin America EUROsociAL. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expert on the FIIAPP–EUROsociAL+ programme?

    My greatest achievement in this project is having helped the Institute for Fiscal Studies to continue to be a key partner in the EUROsocial programme, assisting the IEF in its longstanding work in building stronger public finances in Latin American countries with the support and help of specialists and public employees in Spain.    

    What are you most proud of?

    I am very proud of the role that the Spanish Ministry of Finance, and the Institute in particular, has played in the EUROsocial project over these years, due to the high degree of involvement of public-sector employees, the enthusiasm that exists about contributing to the improvement, the strengthening of public finances in Latin American countries and about a job well done by the entire team 

    How has your assignment contributed to improving the lives of people and the planet?

    I believe that through fiscal policy, the EUROsocial programme contributes from both a tax and budgetary perspective as a key element for the development of countries and the improvement of people’s living conditions. Changes in the structure of public income and expenditure have an impact on the distribution of households’ disposable income, on the securing of the fundamental right to equality, on the improvement of public services and ultimately on the achievement of a solid welfare state that provides a better life for all and, in particular, for the least fortunate.   

    What is the main value of the public aspect of this for you?

    For me, the main value of the public aspect is the protection of general interests. In times of economic crisis, as is the case with the pandemic that we are still experiencing, the public response from countries has been solid. It has demonstrated the relevance of continuing to be committed to State intervention in the economy to correct market failures.  

    What have you learned from this experience?

    I have learned a lot, both personally and professionally. I have been able to share and exchange ideas with officials and policy makers from a large number of countries. But, above all, I have learned the importance of peer collaboration. Assistance to Latin America is always a win-win, we receive more than we give, and that improves us, both professionally and personally.   

  • 11 July 2021

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    “We are closer to a Europe of care services”

    Interview with María Eugenia Rodríguez Palop, vice-president of the European Parliament’s Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality

    María Eugenia Rodríguez Palop, Vicepresidenta de la Comisión de Derechos de las Mujeres e Igualdad de Género del Parlamento Europeo

    On the occasion of the Generation Equality Forum, the global meeting held in Paris to promote gender equality after the setbacks of the pandemic, in association with the European Union EUROsociAL+ programme, we interviewed María Eugenia Rodríguez Palop, vice president of the Commission on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality to analyse some of the main challenges. 

    Can we be satisfied with the new European Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025?

    This strategy has been a real step forward as it considers violence against women in a very comprehensive way. It has ratified the Istanbul Convention, underscoring the stance of the governments that have not ratified it and that promote disinformation campaigns about this convention in the European Union. I do not think that we are going to see a comprehensive directive that covers all male violence, but steps are definitely being taken in the recognition of gender violence as a European crime. 

    It also seeks to put forward specific measures to eliminate all forms of workplace segregation that exist in the employment market. There are completely male and female sectors that include cleaners, supermarket cashiers, health workers and workers in social services. These women are not only underpaid, they are undervalued from a social and cultural point of view. This is one of the questions that the strategy addresses. 

    We want care services to be looked after, to be public, accessible and universal. We want working from home not to be used to overload women and for the work of women in the world of care to be valued, as well as attending to their working conditions and health. We also need to ensure that a greater and better representation of women is achieved in the economic space and on the boards of directors. 

    Are we moving towards a European Pact for care services?

    I would say without any doubt that progress is being made because before they were not even considered whereas now they are.  It should also be pointed out that the social pillar of the European Union, which was the poor relation when compared to EU law and politics, is today much stronger. The minimum wage and wage transparency directive, which is being discussed in the European Parliament, will undoubtedly improve the lives of people and the lives of women in particular because it will expose and hopefully even eliminate the 14% salary gap that exists today between men and women. This gap then translates into a pension gap of 37%, which means that elderly women are far worse off than their male counterparts. 

    In addition, the conciliation directive has been strengthened, meaning that more pressure will be placed on countries to implement it. This is very important in the world of care, which is a world of women and which is completely feminised. 

    The segregation suffered by women in the public and work space is due to the overload of domestic tasks, making it essential to legislate on the co-responsibility of women and men within the home. 

    In short, it seems to me that we are certainly closer to a Europe of care than we were before. 

    At FIIAPP we work a lot with Latin America. What challenges do we share with the region in terms of gender issues?

    I think there are many challenges that we share with Latin America. First and foremost is the fight against male violence. as well as the fight for sexual and reproductive rights. A week ago, Parliament struggled to draw up a resolution to urge all Member States to guarantee the right to safe and legal abortion. In Latin America, progress has been made in Argentina and hopefully in Chile as well. But the extent to which reproductive rights are violated in some regions like Central America is very worrying. 

    I would say that equality between men and women has not been achieved anywhere. Although Europe is moving forward and we must be optimistic, it is moving at a snail’s pace – something that the European Institute for Gender Equality has strived to highlight.  The levels of poverty suffered by women in Latin America are clearly not comparable to what women suffer in the European Union, but, once again, the challenge to achieve equality remains in a number of places. There may be different dimensions, with the problem existing to a varying extent; nevertheless there are objectives that we can absolutely share with Latin American women. In the International Women’s Day strikes on 8 May, this global dimension was evident, as women face very similar problems all  over the world. 

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  • 08 July 2021

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    #PublicExpertise: Cristóbal Guzmán and his work to support digitisation in Ukraine

    We interviewed Cristóbal Guzmán, director of the Digitisation Support programme in Ukraine

    Cristóbal Guzmán coordinates EU support for eGovernment and the digital economy in Ukraine. – a cooperation project financed by the European Union and managed by FIIAPP.  Be part of our #TalentoPublico initiative in more than 100 countries. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expatriate expert?   

    The achievements of other Twinning telecommunications projects that I have had in the past in Poland, Bulgaria or Turkey have inspired me to achieve the forthcoming Digital Ukraine Project. However, often what you think most about in terms of your experience is the failures, because you learn more from them than from achievements.  

    What are you most proud of?   

    The most important thing is the people. Creating an environment in which everyone can take part is therefore something that you can be really proud of.  

    How does your mission as an aid worker and at the same time a public worker contribute, or how has it contributed, to improving the lives of people and/or the planet?  

    That’s a difficult question. I think that the important thing is to carry out the entrusted tasks in line with the planned roles and targets of the administration or institution where you work.  

    What is the main value of the public aspect for you?   

    Without a doubt, the orientation of our work towards people, companies and institutions. Currently, in the European Union-funded Digital Ukraine project that is overseen by FIIAPP, this means the possibility of promoting digital public services, which help the digital transformation of the public administration, bringing Ukraine closer to the EU Digital Single Market.  

    What have you learned?  

    I have learned a lot about how professionals from other countries work and how they solve problems, highlighting the many things we have in common. 

  • 06 July 2021

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    #PublicExpertise: Archivist Beatriz Franco and her experience cooperating with Latin America

    We interview Beatriz Franco, an archivist who has worked in Latin America through the EUROsociAL+ cooperation project strengthening document management and transparency.

    Beatriz Franco is one of the more than 700 specialists from public administrations that FIIAPP mobilises around the world to work strengthening public systems for people and the planet. She is our #PublicTalent. Today, she tells us about her work and the value that public systems have for her. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as a FIIAPP and EUROsociAL+ programme specialist?

    I was fortunate enough to take part in the development of the Document Management and Archives Administration Model for the Transparency and Access to Information Network as coordinator, and it was a very fruitful period. Thanks to this project, I was able to learn about the strategic work in support of the development of quality public policies carried out by the FIIAPP and the EUROsociAL+ programme.   

    One of the projects I enjoyed most was the project for document management standardisation and protection of personal data of medical records in El Salvador, especially because we were able to have a visible influence on health management, which is something we value even more today than ever before.  

    What are you most proud of?

    Of the exchange of knowledge and experience. I’ve met people who do impressive work in public service. I’m very proud to be an official, to be a civil servant. I believe that we must assert our role. The public function is made up of excellently qualified people, great technicians in their specialities, who perform a very useful service to society and are driven by their vocation.   

    How has your assignment contributed to improving the lives of people and the planet?

    I believe that proper document management strengthens transparency and makes it possible to exercise the right to information as an indispensable instrument to facilitate access to civil and political rights and duties, human rights and the right to historical memory. I think policies of transparency and access to public information have become the basis of any democracy and document management is one of the essential basic supports for the implementation of these policies.  

    What is the main value of the public aspect of this for you?

    In my work as an archivist, the main value is to make information available to citizens, and thereby contribute to improving their quality of life and their relationship with public administrations. Making the public public. I think that’s essential.   

    What have you learnt from this experience?

    It has enriched my view of things by allowing me to interact with other colleagues in an environment of shared knowledge and learning. I have to thank FIIAPP and the EUROsociAL+ programme for the opportunity to collaborate in the projects they develop. Thanks to this I’ve grown as a professional and as a person.   

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