• 29 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Interview

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    #PublicExpertise: the public service for citizens as an absolute priority

    We interviewed the Magistrate-Judge, Óscar Rey, of the Civil Registry of Seville who participates in the cooperation project, managed by FIIAPP and AECID, to support the fight against corruption in Mozambique. It is part of the FIIAPP’s #PublicTalent, mobilised in more than 100 countries.

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as a mobilised expert? 

    The greatest achievement so far has been to have been able to get Mozambican institutions to trust in the ability of the Support for the Fight Against Corruption in Mozambique project to work with them to effectively fight against corruption and get their full participation. 

    What are you most proud of? 

    From the teamwork and effort deployed, up to now, with my colleagues at FIIAPP when it comes to defending public technical assistance as an outstanding value. 

    How has your mission as an aid worker and at the same time a public official contributed to improving the lives of people and the planet? 

    As a Magistrate, I view public service to citizens as an absolute priority and as a necessary asset for the well-being of society as a whole. I understand that it is important to export these values and knowledge to other countries through the public technical assistance promoted by FIIAPP. 

    What is the main value of the public aspect for you? 

    Technical capacity and experience, merit and capacity in the selection of professionals, and prioritisation in the professional exercise of the principles of impartiality, objectivity and independence. 

    What learning would you highlight?

    That, sometimes, it is not easy to defend what is public against the commercialism of the market, private consultancies and vested interests. But there is no doubt that in the public sphere there are magnificent professionals who are knowledgeable about daily practice, and that this public model must be defended despite the obstacles. 

  • 27 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #PublicExpertise: sharing the adaptation to climate change experience

    Spain is sharing its experience in climate change adaptation policies with Latin America through public cooperation between public bodies

    La especialista de la OECC, Mónica Sánchez

    We interviewed Mónica Sánchez, a climate change adaptation expert at the Spanish Ministry of Ecological Transition and Demographic Challenge’s Office for Climate Change. Sánchez has worked in Latin America through the EUROCLIMA+ project and is part of the FIIAPP #PublicTalent initiative which is running in over 100 countries.  

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expert working abroad?  

    The most interesting thing is being able to share the Spanish experience in public policy matters for adaptation to climate change with other countries, as well as learning about their experiences when addressing the common challenges that we face. Adaptation to climate change is an area undergoing major development. It is important that spaces are created in which to exchange technical knowledge at both a methodological and practical level. The Spanish experience in the assessment of the previous National Climate Change Adaptation Plan and the preparation of a new, recently approved one, the development of tools such as the AdapteCCa climate change platform and specific sector initiatives, including health and climate change indicators and the National Plan for High Temperature Preventive Action, developed by the Spanish Ministry of Health, are all processes that can inspire the development of adaptation policies in other countries, just as their experiences inspire us in the design and development of ours.   

    What are you most proud of?  

    I believe that the actions in which I have been involved have fostered the exchange of both positive experiences and lessons learned in a highly technical and common learning environment. Adaptation is an area in which there are still many aspects to be defined, so I find it very enriching to have been able to share my experience with technical representatives from other countries. I have also had the opportunity to discuss different approaches and methodologies, as well as challenges that we still have to address, both with counterparts from other countries and with specialists in the field. I think that all the people who have been involved should feel proud of having managed to create this environment of learning and trust.  

    How has your assignment helped to improve the lives of people and the planet?  

    Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humankind, affecting practically all human activities and natural systems, with an impact that is most severe in the most vulnerable countries. Through strategies to adapt to climate change, we contribute to preventing and reducing the risks posed by climate change and to building more resilient societies. Generally speaking, adaptation policies and measures also have multiple associated co-benefits, from improving people’s health and quality of life to conserving biodiversity and the health of ecosystems. All the progress we make to improve the adaptive capacity of countries is an achievement when it comes to coping with the current and future impact of climate change at a global level, not only for current generations but also for future generations.   

    What is the main value of the public aspect for you? 

    For me, the main thing is serving the general interest, with a focus on achieving collective goals that involve all actors in society. The climate emergency that we are experiencing requires coordinated and coherent collective action that can be quickly implemented and maintained in the long term, that is ambitious and systemic, that involves all sectors and at all levels and that allows us to achieve climate neutrality and adapt to the effects of climate change in a fair and sustainable way. These objectives must be achieved globally, so cooperation is absolutely essential. To face a challenge like this, the value of the public sector is undeniable, although it will not be possible without the collaboration of the rest of the actors in society.   

     What have you learned from this experience?  

    Many things. I have found it very enriching to share experiences on common technical challenges that all countries need to tackle in emerging matters such as monitoring adaptation or establishing indicators. I have also learned a lot about different governance schemes and participatory processes that set out and monitor adaptation policies from the experiences gleaned from countries that have a long tradition of developing this type of initiative. I should also mention the methodological issues arising from the expert knowledge provided by specialists from different fields, to which I can add the personal learning process involved in participating in such experiences. In general, I consider them to be very enriching experiences for all the people involved, both professionally and personally. 

     

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  • 22 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #PublicExpertise: Guaranteeing access to justice in Latin America

    We interviewed Joaquín Delgado, a lawyer from the Madrid Provincial Court. As a FIIAPP expert, he has worked to guarantee access to justice through the EUROSOCIAL programme.

    As a FIIAPP expert, Joaquín Delgado has worked to guarantee access to justice for vulnerable people through the EUROSOCIAL+ programme. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expert on the FIIAPP–EUROsociAL+ programme?

    Without a doubt, my greatest achievement is the collaboration with FIIAPP/EUROsociAL in the genesis and implementation of the “Brasilia Rules on Access to Justice for Vulnerable People”, which began in 2007 and continues today.  

    First, I participated in designing and drafting the so-called 100 Brasilia Rules, through to their approval in the Plenary of the Ibero-American Judicial Summit (CJI) that took place in Brasilia in 2008 at the Ibero-American Judicial Summit, which brings together the presidents of the Supreme Courts and Supreme Courts of Justice and the heads of the Judicial Councils from 23 Ibero-American countries.  

    Subsequently, I collaborated with FIIAPP/EUROsociAL in what was a pioneering inter-network action at that time, promoting these Rules to ensure they had the support of the main Ibero-American justice system operators and officials networks:  the Ibero-American Association of Public Ministries (AIAMP), the Inter-American Association of Public Defenders (AIDEF), the Ibero-American Federation of Ombudsman (FIO) and the Ibero-American Union of Lawyers Associations and Groups (UIBA).  

    After updating the Rules approved by the CJI in 2018, FIIAPP/EUROsociAL commissioned me to prepare a Practical Guide to the Brasilia Rules, which came out in 2019.  

    I am currently collaborating in elaborating and developing a strategy to gain approval for an international treaty or agreement on access to justice for vulnerable people. To this end, a Technical Team has been created in which COMJIB, SEGIB, CJI, the Ibero-American Programme for Access to Justice and the Spanish Ministry of Justice are participating, with technical support from FIIAPP/EUROsociAL.  

    What are you most proud of?

    I am very proud to have had the opportunity to contribute, through my work and jurisdictional experience, to the creation of an instrument that has proved very useful in improving the judicial protection of the most vulnerable and, therefore, to improve the effectiveness of their rights 

    There is little point in recognising a right that is not fulfilled. It is not enough for the legislation to include rights, but rather it is necessary to create mechanisms that allow them to be respected and for their effective enforcement. And this is the key role for justice in ensuring the effectiveness of both traditional civil and political rights, as well as economic, social and cultural rights.  

    Which is especially significant as a consequence of the pandemic, because it disproportionately affects vulnerable populations, which are exactly those who have the greatest obstacles to gaining access to justice:  debt and insolvency problems; people who lose their jobs and/or are forced into the underground or informal economy and/or have difficulties in meeting their financial commitments or housing tenancies; victims of online fraud, or gender violence; inmates in prisons and detention centres; people in informal settlements, etc.  

     How has your assignment helped to improve the lives of people and the planet?

    The 100 Brasilia Rules include a series of concrete measures and recommendations to overcome obstacles to judicial protection arising from age (minors and elderly people), victimisation, disability, migration and displacement due to internal conflicts, poverty, gender, belonging to minorities or deprivation of liberty, among other causes.  

    They are aimed at those responsible for judicial public policies, in such a way that the content of the Rules is taken into account in their design and implementation, improving the legal and institutional framework for access to justice for the most vulnerable in society. But it is also aimed at the officials and operators of the justice system, so that they are able to grant the most vulnerable better treatment that is appropriate to their particular circumstances.  

    Now we have to go one step further: the principles and content of the Brasilia Rules must be included in a binding international instrument (international treaty or agreement) that is configured as a benchmark for the actions taken by public bodies in the design, execution and monitoring of public policies, as well as in the performance by the different people who carry out their functions in the judicial system.   

    What is the main value of the public aspect for you?

    People are the raison d’être of the public sphere, so meeting their needs must be the end goal for public institutions.  In the field of justice, we must ensure that the judicial system constitutes an effective guarantee of the rights of all people, regardless of their economic, physical-sensory capacities, gender, whether they belong to a minority, etc. in line with the United Nations 2030 Agenda Sustainable Development Goals, where Goal 16 refers to “the provision of access to justice for all”.   

    What have you learned from this experience?

    The most important lesson I have learned relates to the relevance of establishing mechanisms that enable effective collaboration between the different people and bodies that are involved in a certain action aimed at improving some aspect of the workings of the judicial system (collaboration principle). Which is especially significant in a scenario as complex as justice, in which judges, prosecutors, public defenders, lawyers and other legal professionals are involved; but in which the police, public registries, penitential institutions, experts, etc. and especially companies and citizens also participate and/or collaborate in one way or another, either themselves or through civil society organisations.  

    And these collaboration mechanisms must be facilitated not only at the local and national level, but also at the international level in such a way that the judicial systems of different countries can share their experiences and move forward together in designing values-based measures and products that improve access to justice for all people.  

    In this context, I want to highlight the work that FIIAPP/EUROsociAL has carried out in recent years, which has provided the necessary support so that the different actors in the Latin American judicial systems have collaborated effectively in improving access to justice for vulnerable people: forums for debate and exchange of experiences, protocols, etc. and especially support in the drafting and effectiveness of the 100 Brasilia Rules. 

  • 20 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #PublicExpertise: Improving security in Ghana, Kenya and Senegal

    Civil Guard Colonel Javier Hernández coordinates the European CT-Public Spaces project to reinforce security in Ghana, Kenya and Senegal.

    El Coronel de la Guardia Civil, Javier Hernández

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expatriate expert?

     Managing the (CT-Public Spaces) project with repercussions in several African countries (Ghana, Kenya and Senegal), representing an almost 200-year-old institution like the Guardia Civil and succeeding in improving everyone’s security.  

     What are you most proud of?  

    Of having been able to convey our way of doing things, seriously and rigorously, to security forces in partner countries, and to have forged links with them that will last beyond the duration of the project.  

     How has your assignment helped to improve the lives of people and the planet?

    We contribute to the security of citizens and to the development of their societies. If we succeed, we improve their day-to-day lives and based on this we improve their societies, making them freer and more prosperous.   

     What is the main value of the public aspect for you?

    Providing citizens with security is, without a doubt, the legal responsibility of public administrations, but we all have a role in this regard. In our project we set out to involve the private sector. We must all cooperate within our respective skills areas.   

    What have you learned from this experience?

    You are always learning and it is always possible to do things differently. Each country has its own ways of doing things, times, customs and influences. We must be open to these and we must adapt our procedures to the circumstances, try to collaborate without dictating, inspire trust and establish ties that ensure the continuity of this collaboration, as well as the appropriation of what has been learned by the different security forces of the partner countries. 

     

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  • 15 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #PublicExpertise: the fight against organised crime in Central America

    We interview Dolores Moreno, a forensic pathologist and ICRIME project expert in the fight against organised crime in Central America

    Dolores Moreno is a forensic pathologist and has been a member of the National Corps of Forensic Pathologists for over 25 years. She has been director of the National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences attached to the Ministry of Justice and has worked as a FIIAPP expert in Central America as a participant in the ICRIME project in its fight against organised crime. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expatriate expert?  

    ICRIME works with twelve forensic organisations in seven countries. After several visits and continuous contact with their workers, having the opportunity to get to know them, understand their needs and drafting the improvement proposals in keeping with project goals has, I think, been one of my greatest work-related achievements.  

    What are you most proud of?   

    Of having quickly adapted to the central American culture and of having developed a relationship of trust with the directors of forensic institutions in the region.   

    I am also proud of having been able to rally high-level experts from our ministries and involve them in our project.   

    How has your mission as an aid worker and at the same time a public official contributed to improving the lives of people and/or the planet?   

    Cooperation with the public institutions of these countries allows us to share knowledge and the experience acquired in our civil service. We collaborate in making these public institutions more effective and efficient. To do so, we apply management and quality criteria, working on professional training and technological improvement, which results in better service to the public, greater legal security and better management of public resources.   

    What is the main value of the public aspect for you?   

    Public Administrations don’t try to obtain the maximum profit from the services they provide. Consequently, the parameters to be taken into account when selecting a service will only be those of suitability and the achievement of the expected results. I think this is very important when providing basic services such as those related to security and justice.    

    This does not mean that a public service should not be efficient, on the contrary, public officials have become more committed to the administration of resources and are increasingly being trained in efficiency management, albeit never losing sight of social well-being and without putting citizens at risk.   

    What have you learned?  

    During this time I have had the opportunity to delve into how these organisations operate, which has allowed me to learn from their best practices in management, in the organisation of certain procedures and in the way to solve common problems.   

    I have also witnessed the commitment of the staff in these institutions who, despite cultural differences, share a vocation of public service with us. 

  • 13 July 2021

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    Posteado en : Entrevista

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    #PublicExpertise: Cristina García-Herrera and fiscal cooperation with Latin America

    We interviewed the tax specialist Cristina García-Herrara, Director of Studies at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and expert in the EUROsocial cooperation programme

    Cristina García-Herrera is a specialist in taxation and Director of Studies of the Institute for Tax Studies. In this interview she tells us about her experience as an expert on the programme regarding tax cooperation with Latin America EUROsociAL. 

    What has been the greatest achievement of your experience as an expert on the FIIAPP–EUROsociAL+ programme?

    My greatest achievement in this project is having helped the Institute for Fiscal Studies to continue to be a key partner in the EUROsocial programme, assisting the IEF in its longstanding work in building stronger public finances in Latin American countries with the support and help of specialists and public employees in Spain.    

    What are you most proud of?

    I am very proud of the role that the Spanish Ministry of Finance, and the Institute in particular, has played in the EUROsocial project over these years, due to the high degree of involvement of public-sector employees, the enthusiasm that exists about contributing to the improvement, the strengthening of public finances in Latin American countries and about a job well done by the entire team 

    How has your assignment contributed to improving the lives of people and the planet?

    I believe that through fiscal policy, the EUROsocial programme contributes from both a tax and budgetary perspective as a key element for the development of countries and the improvement of people’s living conditions. Changes in the structure of public income and expenditure have an impact on the distribution of households’ disposable income, on the securing of the fundamental right to equality, on the improvement of public services and ultimately on the achievement of a solid welfare state that provides a better life for all and, in particular, for the least fortunate.   

    What is the main value of the public aspect of this for you?

    For me, the main value of the public aspect is the protection of general interests. In times of economic crisis, as is the case with the pandemic that we are still experiencing, the public response from countries has been solid. It has demonstrated the relevance of continuing to be committed to State intervention in the economy to correct market failures.  

    What have you learned from this experience?

    I have learned a lot, both personally and professionally. I have been able to share and exchange ideas with officials and policy makers from a large number of countries. But, above all, I have learned the importance of peer collaboration. Assistance to Latin America is always a win-win, we receive more than we give, and that improves us, both professionally and personally.