• 16 January 2020

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    Category : Entrevista

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    FIIAPP Expatriates: Angel Vicente López Muriel

    Although before leaving for Turkey, they gave us many instructions when you arrive in Turkey, it is like discovering it for the first time

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    Ángel Vicente López Muriel durante el desarrollo del proyecto en Turquía

    Ángel Vicente López Muriel, coordinator of the Twinning project ‘Better Management of Terrorists and Dangerous Criminals in Prisons and Prevention of Radicalisation‘, which is being carried out in Turkey, tells us about his experience as a FIIAPP expatriate, his adaptation to Turkey and his daily routine in the country.

    What has been the most difficult aspect to adapt to, and the easiest? 

    The hardest thing I have had to do has been to get my residence card. First they needed one document, then another, first I had to go to this office, then another. And finally you realise that this is a country where who you know is very important.  

    The easiest, walking the streets of Ankara. You have a true sense of security. You can leave your wallet or mobile on the table without worrying because when you return they will still be there and this is not possible in many Spanish cities. 

    Is this your first experience of living outside Spain? Is it proving to be very different from your previous ones? 

    I lived in France for many years. Turkey is more similar to Spain in the character of its people than France. However, Spanish cities are more like French cities. I think that Turkey is still a little behind the level of Europe, of course as far as the big cities are concerned. 

    What is your work like, your daily routine? Is it very different from the routine you had in Spain? 

    Office work is similar in terms of administrative work with the difference being that everything here focuses on the project and we always have time limits hanging over us. And another important difference is that we have to manage relations with the beneficiaries (with regard to customs and language) and also the relationships between the beneficiaries and the experts and the participants in the project. 

    How is your relationship with your colleagues and with FIIAPP? 

    Well, although before leaving for Turkey, they gave us many instructions and recommendations, when you arrive in Turkey and live there, it is like discovering it for the first time. Almost everything is different from what I was told, there is always a last minute change in a process that disrupts it, for example, with the phones, we have to pay fees, there were issues with the residence permit, etc.  

    Regarding project management, there are some issues that should be managed by FIIAPP directly with Brussels, as the CFCU responsible for the project’s administrative management puts many obstacles in our way and applies the twinning manual at its own discretion.  

    The relationship with the other RTAs is superb, we share problems and we all try to manage and solve them. 

    How would you rate your experience of working as a FIIAPP expatriate?

    As I said before, FIIAPP provides us with very important logistical support so the project is able to progress. However, the problem we have raised, which could be solved by a call to EU officials, has not been managed. 

    Any experience or anecdote worth highlighting from your arrival/adaptation to the country? 

    One anecdote is when I went to get my hair cut for the first time. If you are very demanding about your haircut you will have to be very patient and choose your hairdresser carefully.  The first time I got my hair cut, when I left I had no choice but to put my hood up and cover my head. 

    The views and opinions expressed in this blog are the sole responsibility of its author.